The Chamber

The Chamber In The Corridors Of Chicago S Top Law Firm Twenty Six Year Old Adam Hall Stands On The Brink Of A Brilliant Legal Career Now He Is Risking It All For A Death Row Killer And An Impossible CaseMaximum Security Unit, Mississippi State Prison Sam Cayhall Is A Former Klansman And Unrepentant Racist Now Facing The Death Penalty For A Fatal Bombing In He Has Run Out Of Chances Except For One The Young, Liberal Chicago Lawyer Who Just Happens To Be His GrandsonWhile The Executioners Prepare The Gas Chamber, While The Protesters Gather And The TV Cameras Wait, Adam Has Only Days, Hours, Minutes To Save His Client For Between The Two Men Is A Chasm Of Shame, Family Lies, And Secrets Including The One Secret That Could Save Sam Cayhall S Life Or Cost Adam His Back Cover

Long before his name became synonymous with the modern legal thriller, he was working 60 70 hours a week at a small Southaven, Mississippi law practice, squeezing in time before going to the office and during courtroom recesses to work on his hobby writing his first novel.Born on February 8, 1955 in Jonesboro, Arkansas, to a construction worker and a homemaker, John Grisham as a child dreamed of

[Read] ➭ The Chamber Author John Grisham – Uc0.info
  • Paperback
  • 632 pages
  • The Chamber
  • John Grisham
  • English
  • 08 December 2018
  • 9780385339667

10 thoughts on “The Chamber

  1. says:

    I started reading this book in December Why did it take me so long to finish it Because of the topic death row, KKK, racism plus I saw the movie before reading it I am strongly against death row and I can t believe something so inhumane can be legal These things are so horrible and painful to read and because of that I ve read it only a couple of times a month It made me feel so sad every time I read it It s a great book, amazing writing, but really sad You can t read it with a dry eye I didn t.

  2. says:

    I thought this was one of the most impacting novels I have read for a long time Grisham thoroughly explores the implications of the death penalty and creates a well rounded and complex character in Sam Cayhall You come to hate him and pity him, asking yourself whether he really deserves death and cheering Adam on as he tries to save him A book I will never forget.

  3. says:

    The Chamber, John GrishamThe Chamber 1994 is a legal thriller written by American author John Grisham It is Grisham s fifth novel In 1967, in Greenville, Mississippi, the office of Jewish lawyer Marvin Kramer is bombed, injuring Kramer and killing his two young sons Sam Cayhall, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, is identified, arrested and tried for their murders, committed in retaliation for Kramer s involvement in the Civil Rights Movement Sam s first two trials, engineered by his Klan connected lawyer, each end in a mistrial Twenty years later, the FBI pressures a suspected associate to testify against Sam at a third trial Sam is convicted and sentenced to death by lethal gas He is sent to the Mississippi State Penitentiary and placed on death row 1996 1374 1006 29 1374 674 29 .

  4. says:

    Look at me, he said, glancingdown at his legs A wretched old man in a red monkey suit A convicted murderer aboutto be gassed like an animal And look at you A fine young man with a beautifuleducation and a bright future Where in the world did I go wrong What happened to me I ve spent mylife hating people, and look what I have to show for it You, you don t hate anybody Andlook where you re headed We have the same blood Why am I here Oh My God..Fantastic..

  5. says:

    Grisham uses fiction to make a compelling case for the abolition of the death penalty.I wouldn t describe this as a thriller, or even a drama, the pace is painfully slow Sam is languishing on death row having been involved with the KKK in his younger years He is now an old man preparing for death in the gas chamber Adam is his lawyer grandson with a fascination for the case and a familial bond which he doesn t quite understand Managing to get assigned to Sam s case, he throws everything into the investigation Will it be enough, though, to prevent the execution This book is heavily biased against capital punishment especially using gas chambers Grisham develops the characters so effectively that an emotional response to Sam is manipulated from the reader The goal is to remind those in favour of the death penalty that the people on death row are still humans, that some of them may be innocent, or at least innocent of the motivations that got them sentenced to death in the first place Grisham has achieved this goal.The Gospel message is somehow included in this book almost in its entirety It begins with the message that God will forgive repentant sinners, but then continues to explain that it is only through Jesus that we can be forgiven Grisham stops short of making it clear that Jesus was our substitute on the cross but He does say that He died for our sin I wasn t expecting to see this as he isn t usually as clear in this area.There is a fair amount of cursing using border line swear words and abuse but not really strongly offensive language There is some sexual content but nothing graphic There is obviously violence, but it wasn t gratuitous.I was bored in places in this novel and felt it could have been a lot shorter I m rating this according to my Grisham scale as I have high expectations.Check out my John Grisham Shelf

  6. says:

    Just finished rereading this amazing book This isn t one of Grisham s popular stories however this book was a life transforming experience for me Two issues this book forced me to deal with on my first reading in 1994 1 How can people any people, Cluckers KKK , the Taliban, street gangs,Fred Phelps and congregation, boy soldiers of Sierra Leone, contract killers, even bullies, et al be so cruel and mean and hateful Where is compassion How did they miss that piece of life How could even members of my own family be so racist all from Arkansas 2 Do I truly oppose the death penalty or do I just tout that I oppose the death penalty Good to read this again and be reminded of my own compassion and convictions Pps 400 401 are the magic ones for me Adam looking at the picture of Sam, his grandfather at 15, celebrating the lynching of a black man with neighbors and family He studied the clear, beautiful eyes of his grandfather and his heart ached He was just a boy, born and reared in a household where hatred of blacks and others was simply a way of life How much of it could be blamed on him Look at those around him, his father, family, friends and neighbors, all probably honest, poor, hardworking people caught for the moment at the end of a cruel ceremony that was commonplace in their society Sam didn t have a chance This was the only world he knew would Adam have been right there in the middle of them if he had been born forty years earlier .How is God s world could Sam Cayhall have become anything other than himself Certainly that is not the answer in every circumstance there is still the nature or nurture question But this book cemented my own understanding of situatedness and has informed my compassionate self, assisted in transforming my spiritual sense to a place of understanding Not every time, of course, but often.And the death penalty Absolutely not No gas chamber, no lethal injection, no firing squad However, I always add this caveat I have never had a loved one who has been a victim of a capital crime I would hope that my convictions would remain if that were ever the case.

  7. says:

    Typically I am a Sci fi Fantasy reader, with a smattering of historical fiction thrown in Really I ll read just about anything, but I have weakness for fairy tales So when my dad recommended this book to me, and went as far as to buy it and give it to me, I was like okay But I decided to give it a chance because it s a book, and I like books.And my response was Wow I have read very few things as heart stirring and thought provoking as this book Who could like a KKK member Murdering people is ALWAYS bad, right And shouldn t people who murder people die Before I read this book I would have said not me, yes, and yes, to each of those questions respectively Now though I would say it depends, yes, and I don t know I learned a lot about humanity I also learned that the best ending isn t always the happiest one Wow This book is good No matter what your typical genre is, take a break and give this book a chance.

  8. says:

    I have strong feelings and opinions related to this book that delves deeper into the issue of an eye for an eye as it relates to the judicial systems of the day A great side story about a member of the KKK after the civil war during the segragation conflict Being from a rural southern area, riding around as a child with a father who always kept a nigger knocker under the seat, and having family that still refuses to grasp the concept of nonjudgmental equality, I really thought this book showed the true side of descriminatin and reverse discrimination that could cause one to reflect on their belief system regarding the death penalty.

  9. says:

    4.5 stars How could Adam ever reconcile the past with the present How could he fairly judge these people and their horrible deed when, but for a quirk of fate, he would have been right there in the middle of them had he been born forty years earlier If Sam was lynching at such an early age, what could be expected of him as an adult How in God s world could Sam Cayhall have become anything other than himself He never had a chance. This is my first John Grisham novel, purchased for a dollar at a local consignment shop It s the story of a young attorney who decides he wants to represent a grandfather he only recently learned he had and who is on death row for his part in a KKK killing decades earlier view spoiler Although the grandfather was only an accomplice in the crime he was convicted of, it turns out that he had participated in several other murders, adding a layer of complexity to the story hide spoiler

  10. says:

    A well written book on the the subject of capital punishment Can you avenge a murder with the death of the murderer, and that too after lapse of many years is the question that was subtly raised throughout the book From a legal point of view the book had merit as the story unfolds the defects of the methods that used to carry out execution thus showing a cruel side of the justice system In this light, the book can perhaps seen as advocating for the abolition of capital punishment However from a fictional point of view, it was much a socio legal commentary than a story.

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